With rust 1.9 released, it should be possible to from now on bootstrap rustc from the previous version of rustc (so 1.10 can be built using 1.9 etc.). This means that it should now be possible to create a rustc package which no longer needs binary snapshots to build, meaning that we might even be able to submit rustc for inclusion in openSUSE Tumbleweed.

This is the first goal.

The second goal would be to bootstrap cargo using the cargo-bootstrap project written in Python. This way, we'd be able to submit cargo for inclusion in openSUSE Tumbleweed as well.

The third goal (lets call it a stretch goal) would be to figure out a set of macros and tools for packaging crates as individual .rpms, or at least macros and tools to make it easier to package cargo-based projects for openSUSE.

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Hack Week 14

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  • over 3 years ago: tserong liked Get rust into Tumbleweed
  • over 3 years ago: pjanouch liked Get rust into Tumbleweed
  • over 3 years ago: hennevogel liked Get rust into Tumbleweed
  • over 3 years ago: ZRen liked Get rust into Tumbleweed
  • over 3 years ago: mkoutny liked Get rust into Tumbleweed
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    • aplanas
      over 3 years ago by aplanas | Reply

      I am myself a wannabe rustacean, can I help here?

      • KGronlund
        over 3 years ago by KGronlund | Reply

        Yes, you are more than welcome! We are all wannabe rustaceans here ;)

    • KGronlund
      about 3 years ago by KGronlund | Reply

      I have been working on integrating the Rust programming language into openSUSE. We previously had a devel project created, but the packaging was incomplete and it was quite far from ready to submit to openSUSE Tumbleweed. This week, I have solved some outstanding issues with compiling Rust using GCC 6, and also resolved some problems with packaging cargo, the project management tool used by Rust language projects.

      We have packaged both the stable release of Rust (version 1.9) and the current beta release of 1.10, so that if someone wants to try the latest features in Rust, they can do so easily.

      Right now, both the compiler and cargo are building and working for Leap and Tumbleweed on i586 (well, i686 is the actual target for LLVM) and x86_64.

      My next goal is to submit the Rust compiler and cargo to Tumbleweed.

      If someone is interested in trying out Rust or helping out with the packaging, they can now install them by adding the develadd-emojirust project to zypper, and then installing the packages rustc-stable and cargo.

      Relevant links:

      • https://hackweek.suse.com/14/projects/1446
      • https://build.opensuse.org/project/show/develadd-emojirust
      • https://www.rust-lang.org (The Rust programming language)
      • https://crates.io (cargo, and the library index for Rust)

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